Sep/Oct 2016 • Vol. XXXVIII No. 5 PoetrySeptember 1, 2016 |

The Man Transfused with the Blood of a Sheep

London, November 1667 Arthur Coga,Once student of Pembroke College, Who read in perfect Latin the lessons at Wilkins ChurchBefore growing “a bit crackt” and soon, without “sound employ,”— Not a fool, mind you,Nonetheless, poor— Was glad for a guinea to open his veinAnd receive in it the blood of a sheep. The room in Arundel House Shimmered with furs and silks.Diviners, physicians, members of Parliament, the Royal Society’s Fellows— It was rumored the King himselfAwaited the news. They cut the neck of the poor mewling thing. Attached the end of a slimSilver pipe to the wound, the other to Coga’s bulging vein, Quills to hold the two together. Then the blood of beastFlowed freely into man, Cool as a meadow stream or breeze lifting from a hillock.Someone shouted from the back of the room, What say you? Speak! Coga coughed,Sputtered, and announced himself Quite ready, sir! For a glass of wormwood wine.When Hooke checked Coga’s pulse,

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Clare Rossini’s most recent book, Lingo, was published by the University of Akron Press. She is currently completing a collection that includes poems about science, technology, and climate change. She is artist-in-residence at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, where she directs a program placing Trinity students in a public school arts classroom.

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