Fall 1966 • Vol. XXVIII No. 4 Book ReviewsSeptember 1, 1966 |

Rhythm and Blues

A History Of English Prose Rhythm by George Saintsbury. Indiana University Press, $8.50. Formidable (whichever way you scan it) and very depressing: these are the impressions a hopeful student of English prose is likely to receive on first taking down a copy of the 1912 or 1922 printing of this work. The formidability one is prepared for of course by the very title, even before one has felt the physical weight of the volume or blown the dust off the rough-cut edges of its 500 pages. It is indeed a promising sign. But the hopeful student of prose—and by that I mean to imply the respecter if not the lover of good prose—can only be dismayed on opening the book to find so much evidence of the literary torture chamber. Here, on page after page, are the creatures of many of the language's finest exponents, penned and cramped and seemingly cowering behind the Professor's foot-scansion bars. Stress symbols dangle above them like broken chains or skull-piercing electrodes. Footnotes p

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Friendly Persuasion

By Wallace Hildick

A History Of English Prose Rhythm by George Saintsbury. Indiana University Press, $8.50. Formidable (whichever way you scan it) and very depressing: these are the impressions a hopeful student of […]

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