Autumn 1941 • Vol. III No. 4 NonfictionFebruary 17, 2024 |

Romanticism

He who seeks to define Romanticism is entering a hazardous occupation which has claimed many victims. It would be foolhardy to desire to multiply the difficulties. I wish to state at the outset, therefore, that I am not concerned with that Romanticism which is taken for the eternal opposite to the principle of Classicism. The thesis that literary expression oscillates between the two contradictory limits of Romanticism and Classicism, in much the same way as the human society or the conduct of the individual may be presumed to oscillate between the two opposite poles of Good and Evil, is an intriguing point of view that will have to be left to another occasion. For the present, I am content with the more limited problem of defining the Romanticism of what is generally called the Romantic Period in European Literature, that century which may be roughly described as stretching for fifty years on either side of the year 1800. Certainly a comprehensive definition of this Romanticism,

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By Louis O. Coxe

He who seeks to define Romanticism is entering a hazardous occupation which has claimed many victims. It would be foolhardy to desire to multiply the difficulties. I wish to state […]

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