Fall 2013 • Vol. XXXV No. 4 Fiction |

Slate Mountain

The sun was a little gift from the gods, pale as a nectarine and hanging just above the treetops on a morning the weatherman on the local NPR affiliate had assured him would begin with a cold misting drizzle and progress to rain. Well, the weatherman—or actually, she was a woman, a weatherwoman, with a soft whispery voice that made you think of a whole range of activities that had nothing whatever to do with the weather—had been wrong before. More times than he could count. Satellites, ocean sensors, hygrometers, anemometers, barometers—they were all right in their way, relaying messages to people stuck in cities who might want to know when to break out their galoshes and umbrellas, but more often than not he could just step out the back door, take a sniff of the air, and tell you with 95 percent accuracy what the day was going to bring. Of course he could. And he did it now, riding a rush of endorphins as he shifted the coffee cup from his right hand to his left to swing open

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Photo of T.C. Boyle
T. C. Boyle is the author of twenty-seven books of fiction, including, After the Plague (2001), Drop City (2003), The Inner Circle (2004), Tooth and Claw (2005), The Human Fly (2005), Talk Talk (2006), The Women (2009), Wild Child (2010), When the Killing’s Done (2011), San Miguel (2012), T. C. Boyle Stories II (2013), The Harder They Come (2015), The Terranauts (2016), as well as The Relive Box and Other Stories, due in October 2019 and featuring two new Kenyon Review stories: "Surtsey" and "The Five-Pound Burrito." Boyle currently lives near Santa Barbara with his wife and three children.

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In the Zone

By T. C. Boyle

The sun was a little gift from the gods, pale as a nectarine and hanging just above the treetops on a morning the weatherman on the local NPR affiliate had […]

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