Fall 2012 • Vol. XXXIV No. 4 Patricia Grodd Poetry Prize |

Elephant Grave

First-Prize Winner 2012 Patricia Grodd Poetry Prize for Young Writers   After an elephant dies, the herd may carry its bones for miles. Did you know that? Hefting them over the flatland ebb and flow, as years ago we trekked the backwoods of late November, New England burned out like candlewick. White light parted maples then, found me chasing your footsteps as you led us home. Last fall the hills blazed red— I wonder if you tasted smoke, oceans away as the first shells hit and you couldn't run. Did you think of the leaves we used to bring home and tape up, the way they all withered in the end? Even the best, the brightest come to nothing, I learned, because there wasn't a body even though you promised to come back. I broke when I heard you were lying alone in scrub grass, no one to lift you up, knowing you were precious. Brother, I would have carried you on my shoulders 'til the horizon bent for us and our forest dawned along its edge. Imagin

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Victoria White attends Milton Academy, Boston, and is also a 2012 Scholastic National Gold Medalist for poetry. Her writing interests include poetry and short stories.

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First-Prize Winner 2012 Patricia Grodd Poetry Prize for Young Writers   After an elephant dies, the herd may carry its bones for miles. Did you know that? Hefting them over […]

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