Fall 2012 • Vol. XXXIV No. 4 Editor's NotesOctober 1, 2012 |

Editor’s Notes

Elie Wiesel resists easy classification. He is an author of power, fearlessness, insight. He is also—and perhaps this is foremost—a witness to atrocity, to the paradoxical human capacities for evil and goodness, for cruelty beyond measure, and for endurance, for survival, for kindness. His work is a supreme example of how literature may resonate with the keenest truth. As the recipient of the 2012 Kenyon Review Award for Literary Achievement he does us honor even as we strive to honor him. This year's award to Professor Wiesel is also part of an ambitious year long symposium developed by The Kenyon Review in collaboration with the Graham Gund Gallery at Kenyon College. "Art and Identity: The Holocaust and Cultural Ownership in the 21st Century" will explore some of the longer-term repercussions that swept across our culture out of the trauma and aftermath of the Holocaust. As is well known, the Nazis looted art from Jewish collectors and families with an efficiency matched b

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Photo of David Lynn
David H. Lynn is the editor emeritus of The Kenyon Review, a professor of English, and special assistant to the president of the college. He was the editor of the Review from 1994 to 2020. As an author, he received a 2016 O. Henry Award for "Divergence." His latest collection, Children of God: New & Selected Stories, was published in 2019 by Braddock Avenue Books.

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Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

Elie Wiesel resists easy classification. He is an author of power, fearlessness, insight. He is also—and perhaps this is foremost—a witness to atrocity, to the paradoxical human capacities for evil […]

Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

Elie Wiesel resists easy classification. He is an author of power, fearlessness, insight. He is also—and perhaps this is foremost—a witness to atrocity, to the paradoxical human capacities for evil […]

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