Fall 2009 • Vol. XXXI No. 4 Patricia Grodd Poetry PrizeOctober 1, 2009 |

The Solitude of Hungarians

Second-Prize Winner 2009 Patricia Grodd Poetry Prize for Young Writers One Sunday in June it was discovered that no one outside of Hungary spoke Hungarian. People choked on their dinners for weeks— they couldn't stand it! Swimming in their rooftop swimming pools, galloping on their Hungarian horses, pondering this idea of America, where Hungary was a feeling in the stomach instead of the heart, how in China, there was no word for bread. It was like having one's husband die in war andbecoming an exile in one's own home. Budapest felt like a spinster's mansion, people wandering the streets with untucked shirts tipping over melon stands in dismay, and all because the Russians spoke Russian instead. There were accidents. Peasants rebelled and only spoke backwards. "Executes God, plans man!" they warned, and Hungarian, the bastard Slavic son, drowned in their mouths and in every river, and you finally had an excuse for not understanding your brother. Last September, one man managed

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.
Kenyon Review logo
Haley Markbreiter, 17, is a reluctant senior at the Spence School. Her parents are lovely, her sister is lovely, and she is honored to be in The Kenyon Review.

Read More

Letter

By Felicity Sheehy

Second-Prize Winner 2009 Patricia Grodd Poetry Prize for Young Writers One Sunday in June it was discovered that no one outside of Hungary spoke Hungarian. People choked on their dinners […]

Young Poets Introduction

By David Baker

Second-Prize Winner 2009 Patricia Grodd Poetry Prize for Young Writers One Sunday in June it was discovered that no one outside of Hungary spoke Hungarian. People choked on their dinners […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.