Fall 2009 • Vol. XXXI No. 4 PoetryOctober 1, 2009 |

A Family Romance

The train to Trieste—Schiele, fifteen,        hoisting his sister's    suitcase onto the rack, a wash of cold light flushing her face like breath        traveling across    glass. Lost in fog, the windows would not give their faces back. Her sleeping feet        brush the skin above    his socks, and outside, the honeysuckle like a pattern of blood repeating itself        around a fence.    Lincoln, depressed, flickering about the edges of the woods for weeks—        his eyes' snow-lashed    halo, and his gun, like his uncle Mordecai, a hermit who kept a dog named Grampus        and hundreds    of pigeons—here are their elaborate houses with gables and columns, far from a double bed        above a general store    where Joshua Speed and long Ishmael lay for four years like brothers. Far from what will swell  

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Adam Day is the author of Model of a City in Civil War (Sarabande Books), and is the recipient of a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellowship for Badger, Apocrypha, a PEN Emerging Writers Award, and an Al Smith Fellowship from the Kentucky Arts Council. His poems have appeared in Boston Review, the Kenyon Review, American Poetry Review, Lana Turner, the Iowa Review, and elsewhere. He coordinates the Baltic Writing Residency in Latvia, Scotland, and the Bernheim Arboretum & Research Forest.

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The train to Trieste—Schiele, fifteen,        hoisting his sister's    suitcase onto the rack, a wash of cold light flushing her face like breath        traveling across    glass. Lost in fog, the windows […]

Aubade

By Adam Day

The train to Trieste—Schiele, fifteen,        hoisting his sister's    suitcase onto the rack, a wash of cold light flushing her face like breath        traveling across    glass. Lost in fog, the windows […]

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