Fall 2005 • Vol. XXVII No. 4 PoetryOctober 1, 2005 |

An Ode to Asymmetry

What you unearth is an unearthly thing: what clings to it is neither root nor soil nor any thing, but evanescent, scentless thought, a hovercraft that crosses on twin foils, back and forth the agitated waters of the mind, and never lands. And what it crosses, it negates; it crosses out. Like the antimatter of the universe, with all of matter's properties reversed: when it meets a particle of matter, the pair annihilate each other— in their place: pure energy, radiant light, as if destruction were divine. Not so! For symmetry is broken from the start, from which all things descend, and here we are. When the universe began— Creation as Big Bang— for reasons science can not explain, the balance tipped toward matter: more was made of matter than of its absent antimatter twin. Perfect symmetry would have equaled pure annihilation, that nothingness of which both Indian saint and French logician dream, exquisite binary machine— Being

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Establishment

By Eleanor Wilner

What you unearth is an unearthly thing: what clings to it is neither root nor soil nor any thing, but evanescent, scentless thought, a hovercraft that crosses on twin foils, […]

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