Fall 2004 • Vol. XXVI No. 4 PoetryOctober 1, 2004 |

Sally’s Hair

It's like living in a light bulb, with the leaves Like filaments and the sky a shell of thin, transparent glass Enclosing the late heaven of a summer day, a canopy Of incandescent blue above the dappled sunlight golden on the grass. I took the train back from Poughkeepsie to New York And in the Port Authority, there at the Suburban Transit window, She asked, "Is this the bus to Princeton?"—which it was. "Do you know Geoffrey Love?" I said I did. She had the blondest hair, Which fell across her shoulders, and a dress of almost phosphorescent blue. She liked Ayn Rand. We went down to the Village for a drink, Where I contrived to miss the last bus to New Jersey, and at 3 A.M. we Walked around and found a cheap hotel I hadn't enough money for And fooled around on its dilapidated couch. An early morning bus (She'd come to see her brother), dinner plans and missed connections And a message on his door about the Jersey shore. Next day A summer dormitory room, my roommat

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John Koethe’s The Swimmer, has just been published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. His previous books include North Point North: New and Selected (2002), Ninety-Fifth Street (2009), which received the Lenore Marshall Award, and ROTC Kills (2012).

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Walking Backwards

By John Koethe

It's like living in a light bulb, with the leaves Like filaments and the sky a shell of thin, transparent glass Enclosing the late heaven of a summer day, a […]

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