Fall 2004 • Vol. XXVI No. 4 Patricia Grodd Poetry PrizeOctober 1, 2004 |

Art Appreciation

Second-Place Winner 2004 Kenyon Review Poetry Prize for Young Writers ❦ "It's hard to say how something so obscure Can speak to us in such a pointed way," He remarked, his voice and gesture so pure That I didn't even know what to say. "It could be how the colors set the mood," I offered, though the piece had not moved me, He chewed on his thumb; slowly he nodded, And I looked hard for what he seemed to see. "Or maybe it's the way the shapes combine To form the bigger picture that they make." He gave no explanation, nor to mine Did he respond; mine had been a mistake. Outside, I smiled when wind blew off his hat. He frowned, not seeing I saw art in that.

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Madeline Weinstein is a sixteen-year-old high school sophomore at the Buckingham, Browne & Nichols School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In addition to poetry, her interests include theater and foreign languages. She lives in Wellesley, Massachusetts, with her parents, brother, and dog, Elliot.

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Second-Place Winner 2004 Kenyon Review Poetry Prize for Young Writers ❦ "It's hard to say how something so obscure Can speak to us in such a pointed way," He remarked, […]

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