Fall 1993 • Vol. XV No. 4 Science, Science Fiction and Poetry |

R.M.I. 3

(The New York Times, March 18, 1987) "We don't give them names because it's not a game," the Lieutenant said. "They run interference for us in dealing with suspects. They can take eyes, ears, touch, even speech and bring them into a hostile situation. That keeps the officers safe. You blow away a bag of bolts, not the cop." Remote Mobile Investigator 3 can pick up a coffee spoon or drag a human being, up to 350 pounds. Can it fire a gun? "Yes!" said Lieutenant Baker, declining to provide details. "The ultimate will be a unit that takes a subject into custody." Many units are already on the job. "They can resolve a situation with as little dramatics as possible. Last week we had a guy, he had three adults and a four-year-old girl in a basement apartment with an Uzi and two handguns. It stood outside the door and called to him for sixteen hours. If he'd asked for food, it could have brought it." An expanding role is seen for the R.M.I. The next generation is on order,

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Pandora

By Melissa Monroe

(The New York Times, March 18, 1987) "We don't give them names because it's not a game," the Lieutenant said. "They run interference for us in dealing with suspects. They […]

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