Fall 1992 • Vol. XIV No. 4 Drama |

From the Secret Mirror: Four Short Plays

THE CALL Lights up. A man, in his thirties, of moderate height, not overly muscular but implicitly aggressive, addresses the audience. He wears casual clothes, is neither stylish nor poorly dressed. He may be unshaven. MAN: Shit!--wouldn't you know it!--we're sitting down for supper and the phone rings and my wife goes to answer it and sure enough it's bad news, I wasn't expecting it but when she said, 'Oh no, oh God, when?' it hit me in the gut and I knew. Like you know, like--your life is cut in half, like--and you can't go back to a minute before--when you didn't know. Because he'd gone into the hospital for tests. Because, his heart--His high blood pressure--Fuck it!--I knew. I'm on the phone saying, 'O.K. Ma, O.K. I'm saying, I'm coming over, Ma, don't cry.' (MAN paces about, clenching fists, striking the palm of one hand with his fist. He is both aggrieved and angry; restraining his emotions with difficulty.) MAN: Just gotta get out--in the car--I'm backing

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Joyce Carol Oates is a recipient of the National Medal of Humanities, the National Book Critics Circle Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Book Award, and the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction, and has been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. She has written some of the most enduring fiction of our time, including We Were the Mulvaneys; Blonde, which was nominated for the National Book Award; and the New York Times bestseller The Accursed. Her memoir The Lost Landscape was published by Ecco in September 2015. She is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University and has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters since 1978.

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Fleuve Bleu

By Joyce Carol Oates

THE CALL Lights up. A man, in his thirties, of moderate height, not overly muscular but implicitly aggressive, addresses the audience. He wears casual clothes, is neither stylish nor poorly […]

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