Fall 1991 • Vol. XIII No. 4 Nonfiction |

Zami: A Portrait of an Artist as a Black Lesbian

Feminists have learned to critique language in which "man" supposedly represents all human beings, but which actually means "male," erasing women and women's experience. Similarly, feminist psychologists have begun to critique theories of human development and morality, finding in them the same assumption of the male as universal, ignoring women's experience and judging them to be stunted, immature, and incapable of sophisticated moral reasoning. Recent feminist studies by Gilligan, Miller, Chodorow, and Belenky, et al. assert that there is a female way of being which is not a stunted or immature way, but a different way. Literary texts are a rich source for documentation and exploration of female development and experience, especially the growing up story or novel of development, the Bildungsroman, and the related Künstlerroman, the novel of development of the artist. Feminist critics have done much significant work on these genres, pointing out once again how our models for th

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From the Black Notebooks

By Toi Derricotte

Feminists have learned to critique language in which "man" supposedly represents all human beings, but which actually means "male," erasing women and women's experience. Similarly, feminist psychologists have begun to […]

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