Fall 1983 • Vol. V No. 4 Nonfiction |

Poetry and Ambition

1.  I see no reason to spend your life writing poems unless your goal is to write great poems.    An ambitious project—but sensible, I think. And it seems to me that contemporary American poetry is afflicted by modesty of ambition—a modesty, alas, genuine . . . if sometimes accompanied by vast pretense. Of course the great majority of contemporary poems, in any era, will always be bad or mediocre. (Our time may well be characterized by more mediocrity and less badness.) But if failure is constant the types of failure vary, and the qualities and habits of our society specify the manners and the methods of our failure. I think that we fail in part because we lack serious ambition.     2.  If I recommend ambition, I do not mean to suggest that it is easy or pleasurable. "I would sooner fail," said Keats at twenty-two, "than not be among the greatest." When he died three years later he believed in his despair that he had done nothing, the poet of "Ode to a Nightin

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Shrubs Burned Away

By Donald Hall

1.  I see no reason to spend your life writing poems unless your goal is to write great poems.    An ambitious project—but sensible, I think. And it seems to me […]

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