Fall 1980 • Vol. II No. 4 FictionOctober 1, 1980 |

The Frog Princess

Her name is Diana, pronounced Diane. She sits at the dining table, head bent, trying not to see, trying not to hear, as her mother and father scream insults at one another. Her mother is French: back home, twenty years ago, she lived in the lap of luxury, eating Brie and drinking Chateau Neuf du Pape each day, doused in the most expensive perfumes, curled up on a Louis Quinze sofa with an adorable little poodle on her lap. She cannot see what led her to marry this boor who now sits opposite her, unshaven, clutching a bottle of beer in his right fist, trying vainly to shout her down. He thumps the table with his beer bottle, he threatens to throw it at her head. "That's right," she taunts him, "just do that. Add murder to all your other crimes." The father picks up the bottle, draws back his right arm, makes as if to throw it. Diana, pronounced Diane, raises her head at this moment. The tableau before her is fixed for ever in her memory. * Diana's father is a decent man, who d

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Sinai

By Michael Tobias

Her name is Diana, pronounced Diane. She sits at the dining table, head bent, trying not to see, trying not to hear, as her mother and father scream insults at […]

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