Autumn 1960 • Vol. XXII No. 4 Book Reviews |

Five Twitterings, Three Songs, and One Roar from the Academy

The New Professors, ed. Robert O. Bowen. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc., 1960. $3.50. Students of mass-culture, now so numerous that they are producing a sub-culture of their own, have demonstrated that specialization has pervaded our society at large and our institutions of higher learning in particular to such a degree that it has "… brought about the dissolution of the educated public and intellectual community."1 That is to say, American universities and the people who teach in them increasingly represent only one more symptom of that terrifying phenomenon called "mass-culture." There was a time not long distant when the word "symposium" identified one of the dialogues of Plato. Now, "symposium" has become a fancy word for anthology; it identifies our mass-cultural faith in the survey, the statistic, in the notion that if you circulate enough questionnaires you will discover a dimension of truth that the single, lonely mind, intelligence, imagination cannot independently

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The Frozen Country

By John McCormick

The New Professors, ed. Robert O. Bowen. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc., 1960. $3.50. Students of mass-culture, now so numerous that they are producing a sub-culture of their own, have […]

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