Fall 1959 • Vol. XXI No. 4 Nonfiction |

The Image of Antony: Lyric and Tragic Imagination

Anthony is no explorer of consciousness. He has very little Hamlet or Macbeth in him. Nor does he, like a Lear, come into his tragic self by the eloquence of suffering. But he has, like everyone, his images of himself, and these he expresses, not directly in soul-searching, but indirectly in imaginative gestures that project the self he has in his mind's eye. That self, being an object of expression, and Antony being Antony, is, it follows, a public self. The play, however, will not grant Antony exclusive control of the public image, various though the contributions of its author are. There must be other contributions, which supplement, and qualify, and assert their claim to describe the public image. Somewhere, we must assume, the real self of Antony does exist among these images. What is the process, we must ask ourselves, which finally permits Antony, against great odds, to project an authentic tragic self which is the image that emerges triumphantly from all the others? The l

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A Note on Meter

By Arnold Stein

Anthony is no explorer of consciousness. He has very little Hamlet or Macbeth in him. Nor does he, like a Lear, come into his tragic self by the eloquence of […]

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