Fall 1959 • Vol. XXI No. 4 Nonfiction |

One Meeting with Mauriac

If you have read everything an author has written, everything that has been written about him, and widely in the background to his work,--more than once, hard,--then you are of two minds about meeting him if you have the chance. You feel that you know him better than yourself already; that you know the best of him, the reflective, the considered part, the part that he wants to be remembered by. And you are sure that you will be disillusioned if you meet him outside his books. But I have met one or two great writers who made these fears seem foolish. And meeting them has turned out to be the most remarkable and rewarding adventure of many years of study. One of these men was François Mauriac. I met him on June 18, 1957, at his apartment in Passy. It was the anniversary of de Gaulle's first call to the Free French after the German breakthrough of I940. Of course I was nervous. I had memorized a list of questions and I had the list in my --pocket in case my memory failed. There wou

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If you have read everything an author has written, everything that has been written about him, and widely in the background to his work,--more than once, hard,--then you are of […]

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