Fall 1959 • Vol. XXI No. 4 NonfictionOctober 1, 1959 |

Malraux’s Genteel Humanism

Hong pondered over Rebecci's vague ideas. The only thing that the West had indelibly impressed upon him was the unique character of life . . . . He had never felt fear of death . . . . But what he did feel was a terrible fear of spoiling this one life which was his, spoiling it irremediably. (Les Conquérants, 1929 ) The more men partake of their civilization, the more they resemble each other . . . . but the less they partake of it, the more they fade away. The everlastingness of man can be conceived of, but it is an everlastingness in nothingness. (Les Noyers d'Altenburg, 1940) Malraux, unlike Camus and Sartre, is not given to public Vli statements of his position: he makes no announcement of what he thinks about Hungary or Algeria or what is his view of Camus' view on these subjects or of Sartre's opinion of Camus' view. Instead, he goes about his job in practical politics and leaves the trained inferrers to their game. And the game, as it must, palls into the idle specu

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Hopi

By Paul West

Hong pondered over Rebecci's vague ideas. The only thing that the West had indelibly impressed upon him was the unique character of life . . . . He had never […]

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