Fall 1959 • Vol. XXI No. 4 Poetry |

A Winter’s World

A jag of white leans downward; sudden ascentsSlant upward; fells and plains Extend for snowy leagues, where bird nor beastEndure the silence; a zero of fall And spring is equally bareOf the usual sparse herbage, meagre light, Or inhalable air; and distance stills The spirit now (that folds, blue as a stone,Into the wells of its aloneness), Where everything stills itself, by itself, Or is stilled within itself, by vastness. --Here the irreverent seem awed As though confronted with a new religion; Not even the knowing reverent can copeWith all the chilly wonder of this region; Breathlessly sunk below the tundra below Its ice, the mammoth dreams of aeons agoBefore ice happened, and thinks much less nowOf age and strength          (it, too, is very silent); Involved in this scene, the mythical snowman Macerates, horribly, its silent prey, While all its north keeps silence, like a woman.What noise, indeed, could enter? What man Sterner than Shackleton could perpetrat

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The Spent Substance

By Albert Herzing

A jag of white leans downward; sudden ascentsSlant upward; fells and plains Extend for snowy leagues, where bird nor beastEndure the silence; a zero of fall And spring is equally […]

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