Fall 1958 • Vol. XX No. 4 NonfictionOctober 1, 1958 |

The Pedestals of Brancusi

The liberating quality of modern art is usually explained in a revolutionary idiom reflecting a largely romantic notion of aesthetic freedom. But while it has signified freedom from appearances, while it has replaced the apples with painting itself, its relation to nature in general has not been clear. For some, (i) nature is an appearance from which shapes are derived and then, according to the compositional logic developing, simply relocated. For others, (2) nature has a logic to which the artistic emotion corresponds. A totally "free" development of the artist's medium presumably expresses that logic—and personal creative freedom. And finally, (3) nature is to some that which is revealed as structure underlying the appearance. In the first instance, Picasso or Braque are the most likely examples, or were. In the second, indiscriminately available at the moment, the so-called abstract expressionist school might be eager to volunteer; but only the late Jackson Pollock managed in

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Notes on a Remark of Seami

By Paul Goodman

The liberating quality of modern art is usually explained in a revolutionary idiom reflecting a largely romantic notion of aesthetic freedom. But while it has signified freedom from appearances, while […]

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