Autumn 1951 • Vol. XIII No. 4 PoetryOctober 1, 1951 |

Aubade

Morning has come at last. The rational light Discovers even the humblest thing that yearns For heaven; from its scaled and shadeless height, Figures its difficult way among the ferns, Nests in the trees, and is ambitious to warm The chilled vein, and to light the spider's thread With modulations hastening to a storm Of the full spectrum, rushing from red to red. I have watched its refinements since the dawn, When, at the bird-call, all the ghosts were gone. The wolf, the fig tree and the woodpecker Were sacred once to Undertaker Mars Honor was done in Rome to that home-wrecker Whose armor and whose ancient, toughened scars Made dance the very meat of Venus' heart, And hot her ichor, and immense her eyes, Till his rough ways and her invincible art Locked and laid low their shining, tangled thighs. My garden yields his fig tree, even now Bearing heraldic fruit at every bough. Someone I have not seen for six full years Might pass this garden through, and might pass by The oleand

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Anthony Hecht (1923- 2004) followed the G.I. bill to study with John Crowe Ransom at Kenyon. He wrote eight books of poetry and two works of nonfiction, winning the Pulitzer Prize for his poetry collection The Hard Hours in 1967. In his lifetime he also received the Bollingen Prize, the Ruth Lilly Prize, the Loines Award, the Librex-Guggenheim Eugenio Montale Award, and the Harriet Monroe Poetry Award, as well as fellowships from the Academy of American Poets, the American Academy in Rome, the Ford Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation. He was a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and lived in Washington, D.C.

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By Anthony Hecht

Morning has come at last. The rational light Discovers even the humblest thing that yearns For heaven; from its scaled and shadeless height, Figures its difficult way among the ferns, […]

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Morning has come at last. The rational light Discovers even the humblest thing that yearns For heaven; from its scaled and shadeless height, Figures its difficult way among the ferns, […]

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