Fall 1950 • Vol. XII No. 4 Nonfiction |

The Italian Vogue

In spite of civil curtailments, and taking advantage of that mixture of illiteracy and carelessness on one side, and connivance on the other, which existed among cultural officialdom, there was in Italy a flourishing of translations from the American since at least the middle '30s and as late as the beginning of the war, and after; and it was in that period that some writers (most obviously perhaps Elio Vittorini and Cesare Pavese) took inspiration from Americans who were being translated, or whom they were translating themselves.1 In this sense the course of new Italian fiction paralleled already many years ago certain trends which existed also in other countries: the attraction, that is, for the American Manner, running all the way from interest to infatuation. It is possible that that development may have reached now its saturation point and the beginning of its decline. Looking back to the pre-war years we realize that in the specific case of Italy it was of some importance that

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