Fall 1947 • Vol. IX No. 4 Book ReviewsOctober 1, 1947 |

Gentleman Historian

A Study of History by Arnold J. Toynbee. Abridgement of Volumes I-VI by D. C. Somervell. Oxford. $5.00. It is in periods of crisis that thinkers have always taken stock of the civilizations to which they belonged. This holds as true for thinkers in aboriginal cultures as it does for those of the so-called higher civilizations. Polynesian, North American Indian and native African philosophers, when their world was threatened with annihilation, seem to have felt the same necessity for stopping to evaluate their past, the same urge to explain the apparent failure of their society and the same spirit of defeat and pessimism, which is so characteristic a feature of thinkers as advanced as Confucius, Plato, and those of our own day. Nor are the primitive theories of societal development so far removed in essence from those offered by men like Plato, St. Augustine, Vico, Hegel, Spengler, and our present author. Assuredly this sudden appearance of inquisitiveness towards one's past,

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What Is Anthropology?

By Paul Radin

A Study of History by Arnold J. Toynbee. Abridgement of Volumes I-VI by D. C. Somervell. Oxford. $5.00. It is in periods of crisis that thinkers have always taken stock […]

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