Fall 1946 • Vol. VIII No. 4 NonfictionOctober 1, 1946 |

The Importance of Religion (Post-War Stock-Taking III)

Contemporary civilization is threatened by its failure to reduce the incidence of destructive hostility, and it is also dispirited by a deficiency in significant public use of interpretive imagination. Contemplating the first failure, it is somewhat chilling to be reminded of the second. It is doubly sad to think of the possibility of a city like New York being totally destroyed by human hostility, and then to reflect that were this to happen, there would go with the city many valuable treasures and resources, yet among them very little that images man's existence in any irreplaceably wonderful way. Men are not so spiritually poor today as they are sometimes said to be, but the imaginative record of what life means to them is still relatively thin and dispersed. Contemporary ideals may stand comparison with those of other ages, but what expression of them will compare with the Acropolis, or the Bible, or the medieval cathedrals? Knowing our lack we too often feebly repeat or imitate

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Dance Letter

By Constance Smith

Contemporary civilization is threatened by its failure to reduce the incidence of destructive hostility, and it is also dispirited by a deficiency in significant public use of interpretive imagination. Contemplating […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.