Fall 1946 • Vol. VIII No. 4 PoetryOctober 1, 1946 |

The First Sunday in Lent

I. IN THE ATTIC  The crooked family chestnut sighs, for March,   Time's fool, is storming up and down the town;   The gray snow squelches and the well-born stamp   From sermons in a scolded, sober mob   That wears away the Sabbath with a frown,   A world below my window. What will clamp   The weak-kneed roots together when the damp   Aches like a conscience, and they grope to rob   The hero under his triumphal arch?   This is the fifth floor attic where I hid   My stolen agates and the cannister   Preserved from Bunker Hill—feathers and guns,   Matchlock and flintlock and percussion-cap;   Gettysburg etched upon the cylinder   Of Father's Colt. A Luger of a Hun,   Once blue as Satan, breaks Napoleon   In a stained print of Waterloo to trap   A chipmunk on a saber where it slid.   On Troy's last day, alas, the populous   Shrines held carnival, and the girls and boys   Flung garlands to the w

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.
Considered by many to be the most important poet in English of the second half of the twentieth century, Robert Lowell studied at Kenyon College under John Crowe Ransom and received an undergraduate degree in 1940. He published over fifteen books of poetry in his lifetime and received the Pulitzer Prize in 1947 at the age of thirty.

Read More

Those Before Us

By Robert Lowell

I. IN THE ATTIC  The crooked family chestnut sighs, for March,   Time's fool, is storming up and down the town;   The gray snow squelches and the well-born stamp   From sermons in […]

The Lesson

By Robert Lowell

I. IN THE ATTIC  The crooked family chestnut sighs, for March,   Time's fool, is storming up and down the town;   The gray snow squelches and the well-born stamp   From sermons in […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.