Autumn 1944 • Vol. VI No. 4 Nonfiction |

Education for the Age of Power

At an early point in Mr. Magg's essay it is clear that he is not writing about labor union education but about political labor education. The bare mention he makes of the educational activities of certain unions is inadequate for suggesting the interest, the variety and the quality of these undertakings; as a reporter Mr. Magg brings back a tiny part of the story. It is decidedly interesting, for instance, that labor courses to which unions send full-time students have established themselves in some of our famous universities, but of this academic bridgehead and of national agencies like the Workers' Education Bureau of America and the American Labor Education Service Mr. Magg reports nothing. Resident schools like the Hudson Shore Labor School and the Wisconsin School for Workers, an adjunct of the University of Wisconsin, are ignored as is the large-scale Workers' Service Program carried on for eight years by the Works Projects Administration (WPA) with the cooperation of labo

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A Note

By Robert Lowell

At an early point in Mr. Magg's essay it is clear that he is not writing about labor union education but about political labor education. The bare mention he makes […]

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