Autumn 1942 • Vol. IV No. 3 Nonfiction |

Notes on Art and War

Lieutenant Commander Edward Steichen seems to have solved the problem of the "American Scene.” The exhibition this photographer designed for the New York Museum of Modern Art is called "The Way to Victory.” It consists of several hundred enlarged photographs, some drawn from the Navy’s files, and some taken especially for the purpose, that is to say, frank propaganda. As such the exhibition is a graphic masterpiece to which Carl Sandburg’s running commentary is as unnecessary as it is occasionally eloquent. But as a telling picture of the face of the land it suggests that here is the way, a recording mechanism in the hands of a skilful reporter, to do what a generation of painters have been straining the limits of their medium to accomplish. It was natural in an essentially literary culture that a school of painting should rise to parallel the growing regionalism of American letters. Critics found an honorable paternity for it in the trinity of Homer, Ryder and Eakins

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Art Letter

By Philip R. Adams

Lieutenant Commander Edward Steichen seems to have solved the problem of the "American Scene.” The exhibition this photographer designed for the New York Museum of Modern Art is called "The […]

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