Nov/Dec 2017 • Vol. XXXIX No. 6 Nonfiction |

How to Mourn

     Everything's far away. Everything's a copy of a copy of a copy.     —The movie Fight Club If you read my fiction, you will find a character named Grandma. In real life, she is dead. This is the story of her death. A story this writer, the main character—T—began drafting the moment she knew Grandma was not long for this earth. A story more like a performance—the sensation of watching yourself from outside your own body, when everything feels unreal, like living in a dream. Or, at least for me, for T, like living in a story. This story begins with T walking nursing-home corridors on her way to see her very recently deceased grandmother. Nauseous from a too-sweet Starbucks latte and chocolate cookie, T is sick with worry, wondering if nausea means she has diabetes. She probably does. It is what killed Grandma, you know. Complications of eating like a poor person: McDonald's, Captain D's, Wendy's, Walmarts fried chicken and mac 'n cheese. T eats l

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Tyrese Coleman
Tyrese L. Coleman is a writer, wife, mother, and attorney. She is also the fiction editor for District Lit, and an associate editor at SmokeLong Quarterly. She is a 2016 Kimbilio Fiction Fellow and was a Nonfiction Scholar at Virginia Quarterly Review’s 2016 Writer’s Conference. Her writing has appeared in several publications, including PANK, Brevity, Rumpus, Hobart, Tahoma Literary Review, and listed in Wigleaf’s Top 50 (Very) Short Fictions. A graduate of the writing program at Johns Hopkins University, she lives in the Washington, DC, metro area, and can be reached at tyresecoleman.com.

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     Everything's far away. Everything's a copy of a copy of a copy.     —The movie Fight Club If you read my fiction, you will find a character named Grandma. In real life, […]

Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

     Everything's far away. Everything's a copy of a copy of a copy.     —The movie Fight Club If you read my fiction, you will find a character named Grandma. In real life, […]

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