Nov/Dec 2020 • Vol. XLII No. 6 Poetry |

Five by Seven

When people have photographs of themselves displayed in their own homes, I always assume they have died and it is their ghosts who invited me over, their ghosts with whom I’m sharing a meal, making small talk about all the bodies and trash on Mount Everest. Oh lacquered ghosts, so high on your own finished triptych of fetes and feats and the corresponding assurance you go unforgotten — let’s go out. From the recent restaurant boom, infer a citywide uptick in rage-ravaged homes. People want new spots to fight, to squall and snipe, lose their appetites, be brought the chalkboard special, not touch it, see it whisked to the kitchen and scraped out back for a dog to eat, but that’s cool — dogs have to eat, too — 

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Natalie Shapero
Natalie Shapero is the professor of the practice of poetry at Tufts University and an editor at large of the Kenyon Review. She was the guest poetry editor for the Sept/Oct 2019 issue of the Kenyon Review. Her poetry collections are Hard Child and No Object, and her writing has appeared in the Nation, the New York Times Magazine, the New Yorker, and elsewhere.

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Speak Low

By Natalie Shapero

When people have photographs of themselves displayed in their own homes, I always assume they have died and it is their ghosts who invited me over, their ghosts with whom […]

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