Fall 1966 • Vol. XXVIII No. 5 Nonfiction |

Comment [on “Where Critics Adore to Dabble”]

I want to comment on the hatchet job by Andrew Wright that passed for a review of my book, The Quest for Certitude in E.M. Forster's Fiction, in your June 1966 number. I was appalled at his ill humor and his arrogant and careless disregard of the true critical-reviewer function—which is to present the important facts concerning a book as clearly, fully, and carefully as possible within the limits of space and then, on the basis of these facts, to present a commentary or critique of the book. To a lesser extent, but almost as flagrantly, Professor Wright exhibited these defects of judgment in his treatment of Wilfred Stone's The Cave and the Mountain. A careful reading of the review reveals more about Wright's mental outlook than it does about the books he professed to be discussing; it reveals that he approached these books, and particularly mine, with a preconceived stance from which he was determined not to depart. The following are some of the more glaring examples of his falla

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Excursion

By Helen Barolini

I want to comment on the hatchet job by Andrew Wright that passed for a review of my book, The Quest for Certitude in E.M. Forster's Fiction, in your June […]

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