May/June 2018 • Vol. XL No. 3 Nature's (Human) Nature |

Nine Things I Learned about Nature on My Skateboard

1 It's totally extreme. There's an old adage … well, it's not that old, like maybe from the '90s, that says "go big, or go home." I usually choose the latter. Major air never was super appealing to me. When I brought my skateboard to push around a campground in Sequoia National Forest, though, I started to understand. When you look at something absolutely enormous, something happens to you. Why did professional skateboarder Bob Burnquist grind a rail off the side of the Grand Canyon and deploy his parachute after five full seconds of free-fall? I thought it was dumb. But when I went west, I realized that the North American landscape is pretty dramatic, and that in a way, it calls us to be commensurate to it. 2 All surfaces are shred-worthy. A righteous man named Ralph Waldo Emerson said, "We live amid surfaces and the true art of life is to skate well on them." Chipped red brick of old mill towns, a Vermont dirt road, even a petrified sand dune in Moab—with 78a soft

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The Cure

By Alice Notley

1 It's totally extreme. There's an old adage … well, it's not that old, like maybe from the '90s, that says "go big, or go home." I usually choose the […]

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