Spring 1966 • Vol. XXVIII No. 2 NonfictionMarch 1, 1966 |

Boswell and the Major

For F.A.P.   The very last note James Boswell made for the journal is this entry, dated 9 March 1795: Too late at Golden Cross. Gravesend Coach just gone out of the yard. Ran to overtake it. Jumped into the Wollwich Long. A fine lively miss eat biscuit, asked a bit & got it. . . . Mrs — wife of a Stable-keeper in Mark lane told us how she had been swindled by Major Semple who drove into their yard in a hackney coach, came out & talked with Ostler saying he was Colonel Hale brother of General (Bernard) Hale & just come from the continent. That he had bought nine horses & wished them to stand in . . . stables and … would [he] assist him to buy some more which he wanted. He then asked the Ostler if he could change him a bank note as he had not silver to pay his coach. He then pulled out a bunch of them seemingly, said he had not one under fifty. The ostler said he could not change it but he would run to some of the neighbors & try to get it changed.

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Excursion

By Robert Wernick

For F.A.P.   The very last note James Boswell made for the journal is this entry, dated 9 March 1795: Too late at Golden Cross. Gravesend Coach just gone out […]

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