Summer 1966 • Vol. XXVIII No. 3 Department KR: A Section of Briefer CommentJune 1, 1966 |

A Conference with “Copey”

For a decade or so before and after the turn of the century, there was on the faculty of Harvard University such a galaxy of distinguished professors—William James, Kittredge, Palmer, Royce, Briggs, Wendell, Santayana, and the like—that the period has been called "The Golden Years in the Harvard Yard." Overall was that great Olympian, President Charles William Eliot, reputed to be intellectually head and shoulders above any other man in the country. It was my good fortune to be a Harvard undergrauate at this time. In this galaxy there was one luminary of lesser magnitude, Mr. Charles Townsend Copeland, already popular with the student body, by whom he was affectionately called "Copey." Although approaching late middle age, he had not yet attained professorial rank, which is to say that he did not stand high in the regard of the administration. Mr. Copeland's scholarship was not profound, he published little, and he sometimes showed considerable disregard for academic conventions

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For a decade or so before and after the turn of the century, there was on the faculty of Harvard University such a galaxy of distinguished professors—William James, Kittredge, Palmer, […]

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