July/Aug 2017 • Vol. XXXIX No. 4 Poetry |

Of What We Know Now

And that February cloudless night, deep, now, in itsown reflection, golden full moons dark blue penumbra;and ice sheets collapsing causing earthquakes, rattling seismographs thousands of miles away, mountain-fire smoke, wind-driven out to sea, enveloping offshore oil platforms. Violent, narco-state-administered opiumin transit, biomass of manufactured plastics resistantto decay weighing more than billions of humans— the violence along social fracture-lines, anarcho-capitalcirculating at infinite speed, returning to itself even before taking leave of itself, on its own plane of intelligence, warping, dissolving nature—the poem in its voracities of contemplation—the poems judgment proven, exact— thought to thought, configurations, in fifty years these words will be written fifty years ago, that is, now. Spectacles—ugly: metal molds stuffed with ammonium nitrate, gasoline, chunks of steel shredded into hot shrapnel on impact, barrel bombs. Of what we know now, algo-trading in

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Lawrence Joseph is the author of five books of poetry, most recently Into It and Codes, Precepts, Biases, and Taboos: Poems 1973–1993, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. His sixth book of poems, So Where Are We?, is forthcoming from FSG in August 2017. He is also the author of two books of prose, Lawyerland (FSG) and The Game Changed: Essays and Other Prose, published by the University of Michigan Press in its Poets on Poetry Series. He is Tinnelly Professor of Law at St. John’s University School of Law and lives in New York City.

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History for Another Time

By Lawrence Joseph

And that February cloudless night, deep, now, in itsown reflection, golden full moons dark blue penumbra;and ice sheets collapsing causing earthquakes, rattling seismographs thousands of miles away, mountain-fire smoke, wind-driven […]

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