July/Aug 2020 • Vol. XLII No. 4 PoetryJuly 1, 2020 |

In Never Land

The mine heals. The black widow crawls away From the sleeve of my father’s coveralls. The beaten woman retrieves her maiden name. Permission of the deepest sort — freedom From tasks, from debts, from guilt, from love —  Is no longer the exclusive realm of husbands. The pilot passes high beyond the wedding And drops her bombs in the desert. The man in the orange windbreaker With the knife in his gym bag knocks, But the retired teacher expecting the nice Young reporter who writes articles on mushrooms To come as he does every Sunday and play rummy Hears only the whistle of her teapot And rushes to the kitchen and does not answer the door.

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Rodney Jones teaches in the Warren Wilson Low Residency MFA Program and is a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. His honors include the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Kingsley Tufts Award, and the Harper Lee Award. His new book, Village Prodigies, which combines techniques of fiction and poetry, will be published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in the spring of 2017.

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By Rodney Jones

The mine heals. The black widow crawls away From the sleeve of my father’s coveralls. The beaten woman retrieves her maiden name. Permission of the deepest sort — freedom From tasks, from […]

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