Summer 2010 • Vol. XXXII No. 3 NonfictionJuly 1, 2010 |

Artichoke Hearts

We would all be better people if we paid attention to our appetites. ---M. F. K. Fisher When my sister started burping shortly after our father died, I assumed it was anxiety, but she claimed that she was channeling our father. People often speak of visitations by the dead after a death, of having them return in dreams; our father appears to have chosen to return by the digestive tract. And this seems fitting, that our father of fierce appetites should make his presence known through the gullet. I've heard many such stories of the dead's return: a few months after my mother's sister Katy died, she returned to my mother in a dream, wearing a diaphanous green dress, standing like a caryatid in an alcove of some underworld; though they didn't speak, my mother knew that her hard-driving sister was content now, finally at peace. My friend Morgan, who grew up in Bulawayo during the bloody war for independence in Zimbabwe, dreamed after her father's death that he came back to

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Elegy

By He Qifang, translated by Canaan R. O. Morse

We would all be better people if we paid attention to our appetites. ---M. F. K. Fisher When my sister started burping shortly after our father died, I assumed it […]

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