Summer 2007 • Vol. XXIX No. 3 FictionJuly 1, 2007 |

The Way a Blind Man Tracks Light

They're saying my name in Maude's room, but that doesn't mean I'm the topic of conversation among all the women watching my sister on her deathbed. Abigail is just using me to talk about something else that's on her mind, some kind of angle she's working to get at one or the other of that bunch in there waiting around and putting in the long hours of the job they're undertaking. Abigail is entertaining herself by referring to me by name, the way a cat will knock a sweetgum ball or a cotton fluff or some other piece of trash around the floor with first one paw, then the other one. Just keeping in practice, working on its style with whatever's before it for a target, not really serious about what it's doing but not wanting to pass up an opportunity to hone its skills for the time ahead when something actually worth killing and eating will show up. And it will, because something always does, and it's just a matter of time until the chance to pounce arrives. When I feel my way in

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Gerald Duff has published a total of fifteen books, including novels, collections of short stories and poems, and books of nonfiction. His most recent works are a memoir, Home Truths: A Deep East Texas Memory and two novels, Blue Sabine, a tale of the generations of women of one deep East Texas family, and Dirty Rice: A Year in the Evangeline League, which is set in the midst of the Great Depression.

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They're saying my name in Maude's room, but that doesn't mean I'm the topic of conversation among all the women watching my sister on her deathbed. Abigail is just using […]

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