Summer 2007 • Vol. XXIX No. 3 Editor's Notes |

Editor’s Notes

Every literary journal has its own aesthetic—a voice or style or feel that it comes to represent over a period of multiple issues and years. This may have to do with an explicit mission or ideology—formalist poetic structure, perhaps, or experimental fiction. Or it may be a reflection of the method of selection itself. For example, some journals manifest the tastes of an individual editor. Or the stories, poems, and essays collected in them may be the fruit of long conversations among members of an editorial board. KR is something of a hybrid. While it's true that I make the final decisions on what we publish—and for better or worse I'm the one to hold accountable—I am also very much aware that we are best served by stretching beyond my particular tastes. On many occasions David Baker or Nancy Zafris or one of our consulting editors will pass something along to me. You won't like this, they say. It's not to your taste. But publish it anyway. Not always do I follow th

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Photo of David Lynn
David H. Lynn is the editor emeritus of The Kenyon Review, a professor of English, and special assistant to the president of the college. He was the editor of the Review from 1994 to 2020. As an author, he received a 2016 O. Henry Award for "Divergence." His latest collection, Children of God: New & Selected Stories, was published in 2019 by Braddock Avenue Books.

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Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

Every literary journal has its own aesthetic—a voice or style or feel that it comes to represent over a period of multiple issues and years. This may have to do […]

Editor’s Notes

By David H. Lynn

Every literary journal has its own aesthetic—a voice or style or feel that it comes to represent over a period of multiple issues and years. This may have to do […]

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