Summer 2004 • Vol. XXVI No. 3 PoetryJuly 1, 2004 |

Questions for Study: Ephemeron

Those are windflowers glowing in the outer darkness        Just beyond the gateposts. If I squint, I see them clearly: white windflowers, flicker of stargas, Bridal-veil nebula—an infinity bent        By the gravity of dawn and rain, but opening. It astonishes me again: I am fifty and pregnant, And beyond the bedroom window September is gathering        It's cosmological light. A child, the windflower says. What's that? Nothing. Or hardly anything Five weeks beyond conceiving. And that monstrous        Morning star above the neighbor's gable mutters, Enough. What's one more human? Heartless, These elemental things, mist on the sidewalk, litter:        And so there are gods again, suddenly. The windflower opens its oblivious scripture As the sun advances degree by omniscient degree.        In the street a shadow of sparrows echoes the oil slick Left by yesterday's downtown express. Details gather ominously, And that is the point, precisely,

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T. R. Hummer’s tenth book of poems, Ephemeron, was published by LSU Press in November 2011; his second book of essays, Available Surfaces, will appear in University of Michigan Press’s Poets on Poetry Series in 2012. He lives in Phoenix, Arizona, and teaches at Arizona State University.

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Terrorism

By T. R. Hummer

Those are windflowers glowing in the outer darkness        Just beyond the gateposts. If I squint, I see them clearly: white windflowers, flicker of stargas, Bridal-veil nebula—an infinity bent        By the […]

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By T. R. Hummer

Those are windflowers glowing in the outer darkness        Just beyond the gateposts. If I squint, I see them clearly: white windflowers, flicker of stargas, Bridal-veil nebula—an infinity bent        By the […]

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