Summer 2003 • Vol. XXV No. 3/4 Poetry |

Pilgrimage to Outeiro

Translated from the Romanian.     A flock of sheep drifts lazily down the hill toward the sea. A boy with an angel on his shoulder plays the shepherd's pipe—exactly the landscape to heal even the blackest soul. On the way to Outeiro a window secretly accompanies me. In it, a serene haiku sketched by a blackbird—its calligraphy of wings, its graphite song. My friends point out the church on the horizon, our destination. We are following the old road of the pilgrims. Within the living soul of the church the body of the martyr, Saint Quintino, reposes alive as ever. We arrive and the desert of the hot afternoon almost engulfs us. An old woman in a white scarf emerges from a car with no wheels, in her hand a huge brass key. Crossing herself, she opens the church doors, then sits quietly in the corner near the still smoking candlesas I say my prayer. When I turn to go outside to the darkness, she draws me down an aisle, gripping my hand. I feel the calluses of her rough palm

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Tess Gallagher’s ninth volume of poetry, Midnight Lantern: New and Selected Poems, is out from Graywolf Press and from Bloodaxe Press in England. Other poetry includes Dear Ghosts, Moon Crossing Bridge, and Amplitude. Her A Path to the Sea, translations of Liliana Ursu’s by Adam Sorkin, Ms. Gallagher and Ms. Ursu came out September 2011. Gallagher’s The Man from Kinvara: Selected Stories was published in fall 2009. In 2008 Blackstaff Press in Belfast published Barnacle Soup—Stories from the West of Ireland, a collaboration with the Sligo storyteller Josie Gray, available in the US from Carnegie Mellon. Distant Rain, a conversation with the highly respected Buddhist nun, Jacucho Setouchi, of Kyoto, is both an art book and a cross-cultural moment.

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Mathematics

By Liliana Ursu, translated by Bruce Weigl

Translated from the Romanian.     A flock of sheep drifts lazily down the hill toward the sea. A boy with an angel on his shoulder plays the shepherd's pipe—exactly […]

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