Summer 2003 • Vol. XXV No. 3/4 NonfictionJuly 1, 2003 |

Inner Landscapes as Sacred Landscapes

1. This essay has its genesis in two events which will frame my discussion. The first occurred in 1978 and the second, twenty years later, in 1998. Both were the occasion of a retrospective exhibit of the work of Mark Rothko: the first at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the second at the National Gallery in Washington. The two experiences are connected in my mind under the aegis of inner and outer landscapes. I'll begin with the year 1978, when I was working as a carpenter framing houses for the aptly named Merritt Construction in Warwick, New York. The Rothko exhibit had recently opened in New York City and on a Saturday I traveled in to see it. If I recall correctly, one walked up the circular ramp of the Guggenheim Museum around and around and through the life's work. For many it was clearly heavy going. But for me Rothko's work was uplifting and I relished the subtle play of form and color in ways I'm sure Rothko himself would not have approved. But as I neared the en

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A Portent

By Paul Kane

1. This essay has its genesis in two events which will frame my discussion. The first occurred in 1978 and the second, twenty years later, in 1998. Both were the […]

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