Summer 2002 • Vol. XXIV No. 3/4 PoetryJuly 1, 2002 |

When I Taught Mary to Eat Avocado

                                        She didn't understand. You couldn't cut straight through with the big knife            because of the pit, or heart, or stone.                                         We gave it many names, and when it was revealed, bone-shade,            heavy-bottomed, she wanted to keep it.                                         She washed it, and the skin dried and crackled, lost shards. I taught her to salt            the pebbled rim, and dig with the tip                                         of a spoon, which is like a knife. The flesh curl surprises, but it's a taste you'll miss.            When she stole the story I told then,                                         how the Aztecs locked up

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Alison Stine
Alison Stine is an essayist, poet, novelist, and visual artist. Her most recent fiction book is a novella The Protectors (Little A), and her most recent book of poetry is Wait (University of Wisconsin Press). An NEA Fellow and former Ruth Lilly Fellow, she works as a reporter, and illustrates for The Rumpus.

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