Summer 2000 • Vol. XXII No. 3/4 PoetryJuly 1, 2000 |

from Echoes & Elixirs

1. It shines through clouds and rain. It dyes the streets with its pink blossoms. The day crawls through its tunnels. The roads are long and long. City without words. Night without night. Somewhere I remember these clothes are not my clothes. These bones are not my bones. I forget and remember again. Ships in the harbor which is the sea which is the journey that awakens a light inside my chest. Look at the hands turning the knobs. The hands that haul the machine. The man on the phone calling, hanging up, calling again. Dust and twisted nails, pebbles and pieces of broken china and all the sweeping that goes on in the world. No help. No use saying "I will wait." It flowers into decades of May. It shines the windows with your passing gaze. 3. Maybe love is a walk to astonishment. Or a ship stranded on the shore of oblivion. The infinity in the atom, the treasures found in a word from long ago, now retrieved, and the mind's chamber so luminous it sees nothing but you. S

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Khaled Mattawa currently teaches in the graduate creative writing program at the University of Michigan. He is the author of four books of poetry and a critical study of the Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish. Mattawa has coedited two anthologies of Arab American literature and translated many volumes of contemporary Arabic poetry. His awards include the Academy of American Poets Fellowship Prize, the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation, and a MacArthur Fellowship. He is the current editor of Michigan Quarterly Review.

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Buster

By Khaled Mattawa

1. It shines through clouds and rain. It dyes the streets with its pink blossoms. The day crawls through its tunnels. The roads are long and long. City without words. […]

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