Summer 1998 • Vol. XX No. 3/4 Kenyon Review ClassicsJuly 1, 1998 |

Winter in Dunbarton

from The Kenyon Review, Winter 1946 Time smiling on this sundial of a world Corrupted the snow-monster and the worm, Ransacker of shard statues and the peers Of Europe; but our cat is cold, is curled For rigor mortis: she no longer smears Her catnip mouse from Christmas; the germ, Mindless and ice, a world against our world, Hurtles her round of brains into her ears; This winter only snowmen turn to stone: And, sick of the long hurly-burly, rise Like butterflies into Jehovah's eyes And shift until their crystals must atone To water; but the days are short and rot The holly on our Father's mound. All day The wastes of snow about our house stare in Through idle windows at the brainless cat; The coke-barrel in the corner whimpers. May The snow recede and red clay furrows set In the grim grin of their erosion, in The fusion of uprooted fallow, fat With muck and winter dropsy, where the tall Snow-monster wipes the coke-fumes from his eyes And scatters his corruption and i

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from The Kenyon Review, Winter 1946 Time smiling on this sundial of a world Corrupted the snow-monster and the worm, Ransacker of shard statues and the peers Of Europe; but […]

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