Summer 1995 • Vol. XVII No. 3/4 PoetryJuly 1, 1995 |

Work Song

—Ireland, they say, has the honour of being the only country which never persecuted the Jews. And do you know why? . . . —Why, sir? Stephen asked, beginning to smile. —Because she never let them in. . . .                         JAMES JOYCE         I A trucker leans on his horn down below. I'm reading an essay on Latino immigrants who live four, five to a room in damp, lightless, studio apartments. They live this way to save every cent— the goal being a family-owned business. The caveat: male-only ownership. The foundation: biblical argument. My father lived in a Grand Street tenement, his parents and brothers cramped in two beds. Pulled from school by fourth grade, the boys were sent to work as schleppers in the garment trade. The money saved bought a truck for hire. The three boys who survived became partners. The three boys who survived became partners. They grew a tough business, were tough

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Story

By Robyn Selman

—Ireland, they say, has the honour of being the only country which never persecuted the Jews. And do you know why? . . . —Why, sir? Stephen asked, beginning to […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.