Summer 1991 • Vol. XIII No. 3 PoetryJuly 1, 1991 |

The Caryatid Fallen Carrying Her Stone

         The figure bears its burden as we bear the          impossible in dreams from which we can find no          escape.                       RAINER MARIA RILKE, Rodin The temple's reduced to one stone. All tensionresides in her right hand holding it up, being weighed down. The rest of her's already folded.A leg angled out, she sits embracingthe other knee. That hug is a pillow her head can press into, displacing its weight, which adds to the stone's. A flutter:the bird who nests behind her face . . . emerald wings and black head hover while in the next room two 'friends" entwineand she can hear the bird drink nectar at her throat; if her eyes fly openit will peck them, as vultures strip the newborn calf before the farmer lifts his gun .  . . she's driving children toward the mountain drapedin snow and night, when half the steering wheelbreaks off and tu

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Voices: Mother and Daughter

By Carole Simmons Oles

         The figure bears its burden as we bear the          impossible in dreams from which we can find no          escape.                       RAINER MARIA RILKE, Rodin The temple's reduced to one stone. All […]

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