Summer 1991 • Vol. XIII No. 3 Poetry |

Revisiting

Open. Children and Senior Citizens free. And so I step into a countryside woodshed saying Good-day to an abandoned chopping-blockwho is eager to show the woundsleft by the family's axe-blows. Tools now out of use lean against the wall or hang from rusty hooks. Some time between the First and Second World Warsa field mouse drowned in the tub of tar. The grandchild I have with me doesn't seethe big holes left in the air by the treetopsbut instead his eye catches something bright in the gravel, something which the sun also seems to fancy: a bluish green slag-stone, a by-product of the production of the main product, iron. Along with myself we are now three critics who agree that something is beautiful. It's hardly enough for a theory of beauty. The sense of decay makes everything fade outand something, by chance, glitter again. On the way home I pass kindred spirits, stone dykes with solitary lizards in them. 

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Los Amantes

By Richard Garcia

Open. Children and Senior Citizens free. And so I step into a countryside woodshed saying Good-day to an abandoned chopping-blockwho is eager to show the woundsleft by the family's axe-blows. […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.