Summer 1990 • Vol. XII No. 3 Book ReviewsJuly 1, 1990 |

On the Cutting Edge

The Kenyon Review. 1939-1970: A Critical History by Marian Janssen. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989. 351 pages. $45.00. In its heyday during the 1940s and the early 1950s, the Kenyon Review had a quarterly circulation of about two thousand. At about the same time the Saturday Review was selling, I should guess, considerably more than a hundred thousand copies per week, and Harper's and the Atlantic almost as many per month. By any quantitative method of measurement, therefore, the Kenyon was small potatoes. Yet if a poll could be taken among persons informed in the literary history of the United States, and those polled were asked to name the most influential literary periodical in the country during that time, the Kenyon probably would get more votes than any other magazine. The three others cited would very likely receive almost no votes at all. On the scale of literary influence they counted for nothing whatever. What gave the Kenyon such influence and

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Genial Scholar

By Louis D. Rubin

The Kenyon Review. 1939-1970: A Critical History by Marian Janssen. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989. 351 pages. $45.00. In its heyday during the 1940s and the early 1950s, […]

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